Herpes virus

Herpes virus

The herpes virus in pigeons DHV1 (Pigeon Herpes Virus 1) is one of the most common but least known disease in pigeons. The disease is inflammation of the frontal respiratory tract.

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Herpes virus The herpes virus in pigeons DHV1 (Pigeon Herpes Virus 1) is one of the most common but least known disease in pigeons.
The disease was also called "contagious snot or malignancy disease" and we also see symptoms of a herpes infection such as the conjunctivitis inflammation, in which the disease is referred to as the "symptomic disease" in this case. Also the name coryza is used.
As mentioned, the progenitor is the very small herpes virus. Like most viruses, the herpes virus can spread rapidly into pigeons.
 
Illnesses
The disease phenomena are inflammations of the foremost respiratory tract, ie from the mouth, the oral cavity, the trachea and sometimes the airbags. In addition, the esophagus (ie the body at the pigeon) is also inflamed.
The inflammations often look like yellow or diphtheria.
The yellowish batter is like a fleece on the mucosa of the mouth or throat.
Especially young pigeons get sick until the age of about ten weeks. However, we also see the problems with old pigeons. The severity of the problems varies greatly.
That variation depends on the resistance of the pigeons and of the herpesvirus strain's virulence. The first symptoms are seen 5 to 7 days after the infection. At young age, many pigeons are infected with herpes virus without seeing clear symptoms. Also, minor symptoms, such as the conjunctivitis inflammation referred to as "the fleece or fleece disease" in young pigeons, are attributed to milder herpes virus strains.
It has been found that about 60% of the pigeon population has been infected with the herpes virus. We are therefore right to consider it as part of the symptom ornithose complex. In severe infections, about 50% of infected pigeons may die due to air bag and lung disease.
The pigeons have severe breathing difficulties. As they were, they leaned backwards on the tail with their heads up while producing a soothing noise.
We also see these phenomena in a handsomed yellow infection. The duration of a herpesvirus infection is 1 to 3 weeks, while in a pigeon cage it sometimes goes away for pigeons for many weeks and therefore becomes a long-term problem. We see that there has been a strong increase in the herpes virus recently. Apparently this keeps pace with the emergence of other viruses in pigeons. Possibly also due to the use of corticosteroids.
 
Therapy
As mentioned, it is also a virus infection, with no results generally expected with drugs. Should bacteria and mycoplasmas occur secondarily, antibiotics may be useful.
Because there are often mixed infections, antibiotics are always administered. Specific antiviral drugs are at most the Acyclovir used in humans, which can be provided in an ointment for the eyes or in tablets. The results we have seen in pigeons are moderate. Preventive vaccination can not be done so far.
It is important for an infection to disinfect the cage, for example, with a formalin-dry detergent. Additionally, it is useful for all diseases to support the pigeons through good nutrition and added vitamins and to prevent stress (think of overpopulation), which increases the disease.
 
Conditions with the same symptoms
In a herpesvirus infection with its typical yellow confusion in the mouth and throat, it is usually thought of yellow (trichomoniasis). Sometimes there is indeed a mixed infection, which makes the case more complicated. If during or after a yellow cure it appears that there are no results, it is obvious that the herpes virus is the cause of the suffering.
Secondly, we must think of the poke dummy in yellow beak. However, the yellow tissue is much more vigorous than in a herpesvirus infection or in yellow. Trichomoniasis, when used to remove the yellow batter, often shows bleeding as opposed to removal of the yellow tissue in the herpesvirus.
Finally, there may be other causes, such as bacterial inflammation or a fungal disease (candidiasis) in the mouth, which shows yellowish inflammatory tissue in the mouth.
There is also confusion with dehydrated mucosa in the mouth that we see after a long hot flight. This often disappears quickly after drinking and, of course, is also easy to remove with a wet cotton swab.